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Home-schooling game design with a 5 years old

There’s only a certain amount of home-schooling and exercises to do at home, especially for little ones. They become exhausted and lose their attention rapidly. A continuous battle to find more and new exciting things to do.

Earlier this month, after half an hour of phonics reading and struggling to get the basics of multiplication we paused these topics for a completely different one. Game design.

Surprisingly as soon as I mentioned we’re going to make our own game I had all the attention and focus in the world. Flows of millions of ideas followed.

A great opportunity to learn by playing, as long as the perception of making a game is considered playing. It was, it is still, even after three weeks, a few hours a week.

Just to name a few there is a plethora of skills and knowledge required to develop and build a game. I obviously picked the technical and advanced topics like software development and integration and assisted him in all the rest.

Project management

Project and game name: Shrot – straight and definite answer from the little one. I’ve tried to discuss and explore alternative options; this was definitive, as the lead designer he made his choice.

The name of the game is Shrot

Next major item and similarly for grown-up projects: managing expectations. We need to set goals, which are achievable in a relatively short term with the time and skills we have. Million of ideas is great but let’s start simple and think big. And so we agreed to base the game on a simple mechanic, a 2-dimensional platformer with a target of 10 levels, playable with a gamepad and on-screen buttons.

We’ve also started to gather and classify workable ideas into a Kanban board using Trello. Trello helps to organise ideas in cards where they can be reordered, prioritized and mark as complete. This is trivial but the core of project management.

Graphic Design

The obvious start is to work on visuals. So we gathered all sorts of arts and crafts and materials we could use. In the current version of the game, there are elements designed with paint, felt pens, gritty pastels, pencils, glitters, wiggly colourful bits, pompoms, cotton, squashed paper, digital media, real-life pictures,  glue and various sorted of crafted items.

The graphical theme is quite broad and organised by theme, especially picked by the little one; jungle, snow, lava, cloud worlds and others.

Game and Level Design

Designing the game and levels is actually one of the most challenging parts. It needs a lot of thinking for the game to flow. We approached it by testing and playing. An interesting game needs to introduce new mechanics and slightly raise the challenge over and over to make it fun and not repetitive. As of now the first level, the jungle, is complete in a sense that it contains all the elements and progression we wanted.

Audio and Music Design

Some of the audio is recorded with a microphone, the main bulk comes from sound libraries where we spent time browsing and exploring sound ideas.

The main tune is actually am acapella recording from Otto from start to finish without and preparation. I told him do you want to sing the music of the game and just did it straight away. First cut. A few days later we layered in synthetic instruments while playing with Garage Band and the result is actually quite fun.

So this is our home-schooling game design experience. Here is the video of the first level, hope you enjoy, and we, especially Otto, 5, can’t wait to get your feedback.

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